Pre-Conference Courses

There are 5 pre-conference courses running over ICCH 2020: Part 2. Please click on the title to see more information on the course:

Wednesday 7 April13:00-17:00 GMT1. Observational coding of healthcare communication: unpacking patient-provider interactions (1/3)
Monday 12 April13:00-16:00 GMT1. Observational coding of healthcare communication: unpacking patient-provider interactions (2/3)
Tuesday 13 April08:00-11:30 GMT4a. Research on shared decision making: contemplating definitions and measures (1/2)
08:00-11:30 GMT4b. Shared decision making: teaching techniques (1/2)
13:00-16:30 GMT1. Observational coding of healthcare communication: unpacking patient-provider interactions (3/3)
Wednesday 14 April08:00-11:30 GMT4a. Research on shared decision making: contemplating definitions and measures (2/2)
08:00-11:30 GMT4b. Shared decision making: teaching techniques (2/2)
15:00-18:30 GMT3. Workplace-based communication skills teaching and learning

1. Observational coding of healthcare communication: unpacking patient-provider interactions

EACH Members
£75
Non Members
£90

Date & Time

Wednesday 7 April 2021 @ 13:00 – 17:00 GMT
Monday 12 April 2021 @ 13.00 – 16.00 GMT
Tuesday 13 April 2021 @ 13.00 – 16.30 GMT

The health provider-patient interaction is complex for researchers to deeply understand the communication dynamics to address person-centred care. To unpack such complex interaction and disentangle specific communication behaviors, observational coding can be used. Several observer-based coding schemes have been developed and are available. However, it may seem daunting to decide when observational coding is useful, how to select or adapt the appropriate coding scheme, and/or how to use it properly to answer your research questions. This course is developed to help researchers or professionals in using observational coding for their research.

The primary focus of the course will be on coding communication behaviours in medical consultations. The course will enable participants to:

  1. decide when (and when not) to use observational coding;
  2. describe different coding schemes and to be able to choose the appropriate scheme for answering their own research question(s);
  3. apply a coding scheme through hands-on practice;
  4. analyse and interpret data;
  5. avoid common pitfalls during observational coding.

Facilitators

Janneke Noordman

Janneke Noordman, PhD
Nivel, Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research, The Netherlands.

Her research interest are person-centred care, participatory research and patient-provider communication with a focus on vulnerable patient groups (e.g. patient with limited health literacy, elderly and patients with psycho-social problems). She is an expert in observational coding and trained many students and researchers in this research methodology, and provides video-feedback to healthcare providers based on their real-life consultations. Janneke is the secretary of the Patient-Provider-Interaction (PPI) Network in The Netherlands and Flanders.

Marij Hillen

Marij Hillen, PhD
Amsterdam University Medical Centers, The Netherlands

Marij researches physician-patient communication, with a focus on patient trust and on (communication about) uncertainty. As co-chair of the research committee of EACH, she has developed an online database of coding instruments for physician-patient communication. In her research, she has developed and used observational coding to assess communication within second opinion consultations, and communication about uncertainty.

Siyang Yuan

Siyang Yuan, BDS, MPH, PhD
Dental Health Services Research Unit, School of Dentistry, University of Dundee, UK.

Her research interests are centred on patient-centred care with a focus on provider-patient communication/interaction. She has developed the Paediatric Dental Triadic Interaction Coding Scheme (PaeD-TrICS) based on direct observations of 50 parent-child-dental professional triads in primary care. She is the Chair of the Special Interest Group of Communication in Oral Healthcare Research and has provided various training workshops to medical/dental students and professionals on communication skills.


3. Workplace-based communication skills teaching and learning

EACH Members
£50
Non Members
£65

Date & Time

Wednesday 14 April @ 15:00 – 18:30 GMT (3.5 hours)

While teaching communication skills during clinical training is important in order to reinforce communication skills learned in formal courses and develop new skills, clinical supervisors can find this task challenging to accomplish. The primary focus of this course will be on approaches to incorporating teaching about communication into the clinical workplace, such as in clinics and on hospital wards where learners participate in patient care.  This course will explore “informal” clinical communication teaching opportunities such as role modeling, observation and responding to patient presentations in the clinical workplace. The course will be highly interactive and participant centred, with a mixture of experiential learning and didactic teaching. Participants will share their experiences and concerns regarding opportunities, strategies and challenges for communication teaching in the clinical setting and/or training and empowering clinical supervisors to emphasize communication skills during clinical teaching. The course is directed towards teachers of health professionals (for example medical students, nurses, physiotherapists, doctors) who are engaged in clinical supervision of learners as well as educators involved in supporting clinical training.

By the end of this course, participants will be to:

  • describe challenges and obstacles to teaching communication skills in clinical context
  • use teachable moments in a busy clinical environment
  • apply course content to implementing workplace based communication teaching to their own institution

Facilitators

Marcy Rosenbaum

Marcy Rosenbaum
University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, USA
Marcy Rosenbaum, PhD, is Professor of Family Medicine at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in the US.  She is currently the President of EACH and former co-chair of tEACH, the teaching committee of EACH.  She has conducted research on and taught about clinical communication and medical education for over 30 years with a particular emphasis on workplace based communication learning.

Jane Ege Møller

Jane Ege Møller
Aarhus University, Denmark
Jane Ege Møller, PhD, is Associate Professor at Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University in Denmark and the Academic Manager of the clinical communication skills courses for residents in Central Denmark Region. She is currently the co-chair of tEACH, the teaching committee of EACH.  

She has done several training and research projects on workplace based communication training, and has more than 15 years of experience in the field of clinical communication and medical education.

Noelle Junod Peron
Switzerland


4a. Research on shared decision making: contemplating definitions and measures

EACH Members
£75
Non Members
£90

Date & Time

Tuesday 13 April @ 08:00 – 11:30 GMT
Wednesday 14 April @ 08:00 – 11:30 GMT

There is a great and ever increasing interest in the conduct and outcomes of research on shared decision making (SDM). At the same time, the debate about how to best define and measure SDM continues.

The objective of this course is to enable researchers to appraise, compare, apply, justify and interpret SDM research designs and methodology.

By the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the breadth of definitions of SDM, and the strengths and limitations of using certain research designs and measurement tools.
  • Apply this knowledge to one’s own (proposed) SDM project.

Plan for session

As a preparation, participants will be sent a synopsis of the theory and 2-3 papers on SDM definition and assessment to read. They will further be asked to think of a relevant research question for an ongoing, planned or hypothetical study.

During the workshop, participants will discuss strengths and limitations of research designs, and SDM definitions and measures in light of participants’ research questions, practice with using common SDM measures, and reflect on appropriate next steps in a the ongoing or planned projects discussed.

The course is directed towards researchers with some background in research on healthcare communication, and who have some prior knowledge on SDM but wish to explore (other) possible ways to research this topic. The course will be held in English and as much as possible will accommodate participants whom English is not their first language.

Facilitators

Arwen Pieterse

Arwen Pieterse
Associate Professor in Medical Decision Making, Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC), The Netherlands
She was trained as a cognitive psychologist and obtained her PhD in 2005, investigating doctor-patient communication. She was Research fellow of the Dutch Cancer Society (2008-2011). Her most recent research work relates to doctor/patient treatment preferences, patient involvement in treatment decision making, and defining and measuring shared decision making. She received the 2018 Jozien Bensing research award from EACH and has been Associate editor of Patient Education and Counseling since 2017.

Marleen Kunneman

Marleen Kunneman
Senior Researcher at the LUMC, The Netherlands and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Mayo Clinic, USA
She was trained as a Clinical Linguist and obtained her PhD in Medicine, focusing on patient-clinician communication and shared decision making (SDM). She has a special interest in technical versus humanistic approaches of SDM, measurement with a wink, burden of patient involvement and making care fit in patients’ lives.

Leonie Visser

Leonie Visser
Senior Researcher at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden in collaboration with the Alzheimer center Amsterdam at Amsterdam University Medical Centers, The Netherlands.
She has a background in Medical Psychology and obtained her PhD investigating medical communication in the oncology setting. Currently, her research focusses on the memory clinic setting, and SDM and risk communication in the context of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.


4b. Shared decision making: teaching techniques

EACH Members
£50
Non Members
£65

Date & Time

Tuesday 13 April @ 08:00 – 11:30 GMT (shared with 4a)
Wednesday 14 April @ 08:00 – 11:30 GMT

The objective of this part of the course is to facilitate communication teachers to appraise and apply teaching techniques about SDM. The workshop is for participants who teach the skills of SDM to learners who are healthcare professionals or studying to become healthcare professionals.

By the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the breadth of definitions of SDM (part 1)
  • Become familiar with and reflect upon using video analysis and role playing to teach SDM skills
  • Apply the techniques to one’s own communication teaching

The course is directed towards teachers with some background in teaching healthcare communication, and who have some prior knowledge on SDM but wish to explore (other) possible ways to teach this topic. The course will be held in English and as much as possible will accommodate participants whom English is not their first language.

The workshop is a pilot and so participants will be asked to review the content and structure of the workshop, consequently this part of the course has a reduced fee.

As preparation for part 1 of the course, participants will be sent a synopsis of the theory and 2-3 papers on SDM. No additional preparation is required for part 2.

Facilitators

Annegrethe Nielsen

Annegrethe Nielsen
University College Copenhagen, Denmark
Annegrethe Nielsen, Ph.D, is a senior lecturer at the nursing department at University College Copenhagen. She has been teaching communication skills to students and professionals of a variety of healthcare professions for more than 20 years and is a member of the teaching committee of EACH. She is especially interested in the skills of shared decision making and how to teach and implement the skills in professional practice.

Sarah Shepherd

Sarah Shepherd
Senior lecturer and lead for the clinical communication programme at Manchester Medical School, University of Manchester, UK. She has undertaken research in Shared Decision Making and doctor patient communication. Currently she trains educators and teaches communication skills in medical education.

Ana Carvajal de la Torre
Family Physician at Servicio Galego de Saude, Spain. She has been teaching communication skills to postgraduate students, residents, and other healthcare professionals for more than 20 years. Member of the teaching committee of EACH. Currently Ph.D. student on the topic of Shared Decision Making in which she is especially interested.