Pre-Conference Courses

There are 5 pre-conference courses running over ICCH 2020: Part 2. Please click on the title to see more information on the course:

Wednesday 7 April13:00-17:00 GMT1. Observational coding of healthcare communication: unpacking patient-provider interactions (1/3)
Monday 12 April12:30-16:00 GMT5. Knowledge translation in health communication. Linking research, policy and practice
13:00-16:00 GMT1. Observational coding of healthcare communication: unpacking patient-provider interactions (2/3)
Tuesday 13 April08:00-11:30 GMT4a. Research on shared decision making: contemplating definitions and measures (1/2)
08:00-11:30 GMT4b. Shared decision making: teaching techniques (1/2)
13:00-16:30 GMT1. Observational coding of healthcare communication: unpacking patient-provider interactions (3/3)
Wednesday 14 April08:00-11:30 GMT4a. Research on shared decision making: contemplating definitions and measures (2/2)
08:00-11:30 GMT4b. Shared decision making: teaching techniques (2/2)
15:00-18:00 GMT2. Can I really say that? Navigating feedback across differences
15:00-18:30 GMT3. Workplace-based communication skills teaching and learning

1. Observational coding of healthcare communication: unpacking patient-provider interactions

EACH Members
£75
Non Members
£90

Date & Time

Wednesday 7 April 2021 @ 13:00 – 17:00 GMT
Monday 12 April 2021 @ 13.00 – 16.00 GMT
Tuesday 13 April 2021 @ 13.00 – 16.30 GMT

The health provider-patient interaction is complex for researchers to deeply understand the communication dynamics to address person-centred care. To unpack such complex interaction and disentangle specific communication behaviors, observational coding can be used. Several observer-based coding schemes have been developed and are available. However, it may seem daunting to decide when observational coding is useful, how to select or adapt the appropriate coding scheme, and/or how to use it properly to answer your research questions. This course is developed to help researchers or professionals in using observational coding for their research.

The primary focus of the course will be on coding communication behaviours in medical consultations. The course will enable participants to:

  1. decide when (and when not) to use observational coding;
  2. describe different coding schemes and to be able to choose the appropriate scheme for answering their own research question(s);
  3. apply a coding scheme through hands-on practice;
  4. analyse and interpret data;
  5. avoid common pitfalls during observational coding.

Facilitators

Janneke Noordman

Janneke Noordman, PhD
Nivel, Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research, The Netherlands.

Her research interest are person-centred care, participatory research and patient-provider communication with a focus on vulnerable patient groups (e.g. patient with limited health literacy, elderly and patients with psycho-social problems). She is an expert in observational coding and trained many students and researchers in this research methodology, and provides video-feedback to healthcare providers based on their real-life consultations. Janneke is the secretary of the Patient-Provider-Interaction (PPI) Network in The Netherlands and Flanders.

Marij Hillen

Marij Hillen, PhD
Amsterdam University Medical Centers, The Netherlands

Marij researches physician-patient communication, with a focus on patient trust and on (communication about) uncertainty. As co-chair of the research committee of EACH, she has developed an online database of coding instruments for physician-patient communication. In her research, she has developed and used observational coding to assess communication within second opinion consultations, and communication about uncertainty.

Siyang Yuan

Siyang Yuan, BDS, MPH, PhD
Dental Health Services Research Unit, School of Dentistry, University of Dundee, UK.

Her research interests are centred on patient-centred care with a focus on provider-patient communication/interaction. She has developed the Paediatric Dental Triadic Interaction Coding Scheme (PaeD-TrICS) based on direct observations of 50 parent-child-dental professional triads in primary care. She is the Chair of the Special Interest Group of Communication in Oral Healthcare Research and has provided various training workshops to medical/dental students and professionals on communication skills.


2. Can I really say that? Navigating feedback across differences

EACH Members
£50
Non Members
£65

Date & Time

Wednesday 14 April @ 15:00 – 18:00 GMT (3 hours)

Feedback is an essential component of effective teaching in health professions education and requires skills that, though possible to learn, take a lifetime to master. Giving and receiving feedback across racial, ethnic, religious, gender, LGBTQI identities and other power differences adds complexity to this process. Additionally, faculty competence in fostering a positive learning climate for all team members remains aspirational due to differences in privilege and powerful social constructs that can be extremely difficult to name and disrupt. In this experiential workshop, participants will learn to recognize and begin to overcome personal obstacles, including implicit bias and stereotype threat, and practice advanced skills in conducting feedback conversations across differences using their own challenging cases. Facilitators will support participants in their readiness for skills practice by fostering a shared understanding of key concepts and demonstrating skills. The workshop is suited to participants who engage in feedback conversations in clinical and/or academic settings.

Plan for session

As pre-work, we will ask participants to prepare for the session by writing a short narrative about their experiences with giving and/or receiving feedback across differences in health professions education. We will use these narratives as source material to practice strategies for feedback.

  1. Introductions, ground rules
  2. Underlying theory and evidence base for effective feedback
  3. Reflective exercises to deepen understanding of stereotype threat and implicit bias, and how these affect approaches to feedback
  4. Integrative practice in the five elements of conducting feedback conversations across differences, using participant narratives and experiences: set-up, observation, reinforcing feedback, corrective feedback, and next steps

During the session, we will spend most of our time interactively, in experiential rather than didactic formats that will include discussions, reflections, perspective-taking exercises, and simulations. Therefore, participants who arrive prepared to engage with others and to deepen their own personal awareness will derive the most out of the pre-course.

Facilitators

Calvin Chou

Calvin Chou, MD, PhD, FACH
University of California, San Francisco
Calvin Chouis Professor of Clinical Medicine at the University of California at San Francisco, and staff physician at the Veterans Affairs Health Care System in San Francisco. As Senior Faculty Advisor for External Education with the Academy of Communication in Healthcare, he is recognized internationally for leading workshops in relationship-centered communication, feedback, conflict, and remediation in health professions education. He is co-editor of the books Remediation in Medical Education: A Midcourse Correction, and Communication Rx: Transforming Healthcare Through Relationship-Centered Communication.

Denise Davis, MD, FACH
University of California, San Francisco
Denise Lynne Davis is Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of California San Francisco where she is also Specialist for Diversity for the School of Medicine. She is Academy on Communication in Healthcare Vice President for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, and she leads workshops nationally on fundamental clinical and teamwork communication, equity and inclusion, and feedback. Denise proudly identifies as a Black American woman physician and mother.

Kara Myers

Kara Myers, CNM, FACH
Academy of Communication in Healthcare
Kara Myers, CNM, MS, FACH, is past president of the Academy of Communication in Healthcare and has been practicing nurse-midwifery since 2000, when she completed graduate training at UCSF.  She is currently Clinical Professor in the UCSF Department of OB, Gyn, and Reproductive Sciences. Kara serves as a member of the leadership council for the nurse-midwifery faculty practice at Zuckerberg San Francisco General and co-directs the hospital’s Relationship Centered Communication program. Within the UCSF community and nationally, as faculty of ACH, Kara regularly facilitates workshops in relationship centered communication, conflict, and feedback. In collaboration with colleagues, she has designed and implemented workshops focusing on the application of relationship centered communication to the promotion of equity in health care and health professions education.


3. Workplace-based communication skills teaching and learning

EACH Members
£50
Non Members
£65

Date & Time

Wednesday 14 April @ 15:00 – 18:30 GMT (3.5 hours)

While teaching communication skills during clinical training is important in order to reinforce communication skills learned in formal courses and develop new skills, clinical supervisors can find this task challenging to accomplish. The primary focus of this course will be on approaches to incorporating teaching about communication into the clinical workplace, such as in clinics and on hospital wards where learners participate in patient care.  This course will explore “informal” clinical communication teaching opportunities such as role modeling, observation and responding to patient presentations in the clinical workplace. The course will be highly interactive and participant centred, with a mixture of experiential learning and didactic teaching. Participants will share their experiences and concerns regarding opportunities, strategies and challenges for communication teaching in the clinical setting and/or training and empowering clinical supervisors to emphasize communication skills during clinical teaching. The course is directed towards teachers of health professionals (for example medical students, nurses, physiotherapists, doctors) who are engaged in clinical supervision of learners as well as educators involved in supporting clinical training.

By the end of this course, participants will be to:

  • describe challenges and obstacles to teaching communication skills in clinical context
  • use teachable moments in a busy clinical environment
  • apply course content to implementing workplace based communication teaching to their own institution

Facilitators

Marcy Rosenbaum

Marcy Rosenbaum
University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, USA
Marcy Rosenbaum, PhD, is Professor of Family Medicine at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in the US.  She is currently the President of EACH and former co-chair of tEACH, the teaching committee of EACH.  She has conducted research on and taught about clinical communication and medical education for over 30 years with a particular emphasis on workplace based communication learning.

Jane Ege Møller

Jane Ege Møller
Aarhus University, Denmark
Jane Ege Møller, PhD, is Associate Professor at Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University in Denmark and the Academic Manager of the clinical communication skills courses for residents in Central Denmark Region. She is currently the co-chair of tEACH, the teaching committee of EACH.  

She has done several training and research projects on workplace based communication training, and has more than 15 years of experience in the field of clinical communication and medical education.

Noelle Junod Peron
Switzerland


4a. Research on shared decision making: contemplating definitions and measures

EACH Members
£75
Non Members
£90

Date & Time

Tuesday 13 April @ 08:00 – 11:30 GMT
Wednesday 14 April @ 08:00 – 11:30 GMT

There is a great and ever increasing interest in the conduct and outcomes of research on shared decision making (SDM). At the same time, the debate about how to best define and measure SDM continues.

The objective of this course is to enable researchers to appraise, compare, apply, justify and interpret SDM research designs and methodology.

By the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the breadth of definitions of SDM, and the strengths and limitations of using certain research designs and measurement tools.
  • Apply this knowledge to one’s own (proposed) SDM project.

Plan for session

As a preparation, participants will be sent a synopsis of the theory and 2-3 papers on SDM definition and assessment to read. They will further be asked to think of a relevant research question for an ongoing, planned or hypothetical study.

During the workshop, participants will discuss strengths and limitations of research designs, and SDM definitions and measures in light of participants’ research questions, practice with using common SDM measures, and reflect on appropriate next steps in a the ongoing or planned projects discussed.

The course is directed towards researchers with some background in research on healthcare communication, and who have some prior knowledge on SDM but wish to explore (other) possible ways to research this topic. The course will be held in English and as much as possible will accommodate participants whom English is not their first language.

Facilitators

Arwen Pieterse

Arwen Pieterse
Associate Professor in Medical Decision Making, Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC), The Netherlands
She was trained as a cognitive psychologist and obtained her PhD in 2005, investigating doctor-patient communication. She was Research fellow of the Dutch Cancer Society (2008-2011). Her most recent research work relates to doctor/patient treatment preferences, patient involvement in treatment decision making, and defining and measuring shared decision making. She received the 2018 Jozien Bensing research award from EACH and has been Associate editor of Patient Education and Counseling since 2017.

Marleen Kunneman

Marleen Kunneman
Senior Researcher at the LUMC, The Netherlands and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Mayo Clinic, USA
She was trained as a Clinical Linguist and obtained her PhD in Medicine, focusing on patient-clinician communication and shared decision making (SDM). She has a special interest in technical versus humanistic approaches of SDM, measurement with a wink, burden of patient involvement and making care fit in patients’ lives.

Leonie Visser

Leonie Visser
Senior Researcher at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden in collaboration with the Alzheimer center Amsterdam at Amsterdam University Medical Centers, The Netherlands.
She has a background in Medical Psychology and obtained her PhD investigating medical communication in the oncology setting. Currently, her research focusses on the memory clinic setting, and SDM and risk communication in the context of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.


4b. Shared decision making: teaching techniques

EACH Members
£50
Non Members
£65

Date & Time

Tuesday 13 April @ 08:00 – 11:30 GMT (shared with 4a)
Wednesday 14 April @ 08:00 – 11:30 GMT

The objective of this part of the course is to facilitate communication teachers to appraise and apply teaching techniques about SDM. The workshop is for participants who teach the skills of SDM to learners who are healthcare professionals or studying to become healthcare professionals.

By the end of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the breadth of definitions of SDM (part 1)
  • Become familiar with and reflect upon using video analysis and role playing to teach SDM skills
  • Apply the techniques to one’s own communication teaching

The course is directed towards teachers with some background in teaching healthcare communication, and who have some prior knowledge on SDM but wish to explore (other) possible ways to teach this topic. The course will be held in English and as much as possible will accommodate participants whom English is not their first language.

The workshop is a pilot and so participants will be asked to review the content and structure of the workshop, consequently this part of the course has a reduced fee.

As preparation for part 1 of the course, participants will be sent a synopsis of the theory and 2-3 papers on SDM. No additional preparation is required for part 2.

Facilitators

Annegrethe Nielsen

Annegrethe Nielsen
University College Copenhagen, Denmark
Annegrethe Nielsen, Ph.D, is a senior lecturer at the nursing department at University College Copenhagen. She has been teaching communication skills to students and professionals of a variety of healthcare professions for more than 20 years and is a member of the teaching committee of EACH. She is especially interested in the skills of shared decision making and how to teach and implement the skills in professional practice.

Sarah Shepherd

Sarah Shepherd
Senior lecturer and lead for the clinical communication programme at Manchester Medical School, University of Manchester, UK. She has undertaken research in Shared Decision Making and doctor patient communication. Currently she trains educators and teaches communication skills in medical education.

Ana Carvajal de la Torre
To follow.


5. Knowledge translation in health communication. Linking research, policy and practice

EACH Members
£50
Non Members
£65

Date & Time

Tuesday 13 April @ 12:30 – 16:00 GMT (to be confirmed)

There is consistent agreement on the failure to translate research finding into healthcare policy and practice. Moreover, it is essential to apply evidence that is not only the product of scientifically rigorous methodologies, but which is also directly relevant to patient needs. Processes of knowledge translation are needed to transform knowledge into decisions and actions for the benefit of patient outcomes. Knowledge translation presupposes, first, the identification of evidence that matters in a specific context. Second, it requires a dialogue between research and knowledge users (the stakeholders) who have to agree on the value of a certain body of knowledge and on how to implement it. The conceptual framework for this workshop is rooted in the knowledge translation process fostered by the MacMaster Health Forum and by the Swiss Learning Health System (SLHS) headed by the Department of Health Sciences and Health Policy of the University of Lucerne (Switzerland).

The aim of this workshop is to equip participants with knowledge and practice of knowledge, skills and actions needed to plan and implement an intervention of knowledge translation in health communication.

Learning objectives

Four are the main learning objectives of this workshop. Specifically, participants will learn:

  1. how to identify issues in health communication that require knowledge translation action to improve the healthcare system; 
  2. how to prepare and use a policy brief to support evidence-informed policymaking;
  3. how to organize and conduct a stakeholder dialogue aimed at generating agreement among the relevant stakeholders on a knowledge translation action;
  4. how to present ideas for implementation in a persuasive way and to successfully engage in deliberative communication.

Teaching methods

After an introduction into the main content of the knowledge translation process (1/2h), the workshop will be conducted as a role-play exercise where participants will play the role of different stakeholders (2 h). The exercise will start with a presentation of the issue of health communication that needs a solution (e.g. the implementation of a share-decision making procedure in a specific oncological setting). A policy brief will be distributed with evidence on options on how to address the issue, together with a description of the role that participants play in the stakeholder dialogue (e.g. the roles of health professionals, nurses, patients and family members, health institution economists and managers). Stakeholders will be asked to reflect, individually, on which is the best evidence to implement. A stakeholder dialogue will then be run, where stakeholders will practice in deliberative communication to reach agreement on the best solution to be implemented.

Evaluation

At the end of the workshop, participants will engage in a debriefing (for 1/2h) structured in the following three phases:

Phase 1. Overall reflection, focused on the identification of key concepts and challenges of knowledge translation.

Phase 2. Personalization, focused on the expression of individual experiences in the role-play exercise.

Phase 3. Application, focused on how the results of the workshop can be used in participants’ professional contexts.  

Involvement of facilitators

Sara Rubinelli, Nicola Diviani, and Maddalena Fiordelli will provide the theoretical basis to understand knowledge translation as a process in health communication. They will facilitate the engagement of participants in the role-play exercise, and moderate the stakeholder dialogue to assure overall participation. They will guide the debriefing section so that participants can have a clear ‘take-home’ message.  

Since 2015 Sara Rubinelli has been giving this workshop to the students of the Master program in Health Sciences at the University of Lucerne. Moreover, this workshop is implementing a methodology of knowledge translation that Sara Rubinelli is developing for the SLHS. The SLHS is a collaborative project between seven academic partner institutions to establish a national platform for health systems and services research, policy and practice. The goal of the SLHS is to foster the dialogue between different stakeholders with the aim of developing and continuously integrating research-based solutions to current and future challenges in the health care system.

Facilitators

Sara Rubinelli

Prof. Sara Rubinelli
Sara Rubinelli holds a degree in Classics and Philosophy from the Catholic University of Milan (I) and a PhD from the University of Leeds (UK) in the areas of argumentation theory, persuasion and rhetoric. Since September 2009 she is Scientific Coordinator of the Human Functioning Unit at Swiss Paraplegic Research (CH) and leads there the Person-Centered Healthcare Group. Currently, she is Professor in Health Sciences with a focus in health communication at the Department of Health Sciences and Medicine of the University of Lucerne (CH). Her main research and teaching topics include: interpersonal communication, (health) behaviour change, social marketing and health campaigns, society in the information age, communication for education, empowerment and personal growth, professional communication and public speaking, philosophy of science and theories and models of health and well-being. Since September 2017 she is President of the International Association for Communication in Healthcare (EACH).

Dr. Diviani Nicola
Nicola Diviani holds a PhD in Communication Sciences from the University of Lugano. His main research interests include health behaviour, health literacy, self-management, (online) health information seeking, health empowerment, eHealth, and mHealth. He has been conducting research on these topics for several years at the Institute of Communication and Health of the University of Lugano, at Harvard School of Public Health, and at the Amsterdam School of Communication Research. Currently, Nicola Diviani is a senior research fellow at Swiss Paraplegic Research (SPF), Human Functioning Unit, Person Centered Health Care & Health Communication Group and lecturer at University of Lucerne, Department of Health Sciences and Medicine. Since 2016 he is the National Representative for Switzerland in the Advisory Committee of the International Association for Communication in Healthcare (EACH).

Dr. Maddalena Fiordelli
Maddalena Fiordelli is Scientific Researcher and Lecturer at the USI Faculty of Communication Sciences (CH), where she obtained her PhD in 2009. During her PhD she was visiting scholar at the University of Amsterdam. Her main research interests include eHealth, mHealth, participatory research, and social isolation. Maddalena collaborates with the Swiss Paraplegic Research and the Faculty of BioMedicine (USI). Since 2019 she is the treasurer of the International Association for Communication in Healthcare (EACH).